The Mysterious Mystery of the Miscreants and future inspirations from the fjords of Iceland

site rencontre gratuit a montreal The following is an update of the creative work I have been pursuing over the last few months:

http://salsiando.com/finelit/5139 I am in the process of creating finished full colour screenprints for the next see Miscreants Art Collective group show which will be showcased November 2017 next year.The new show will feature old members, new members and their featured bands and their music. The show will once again feature a tape and zine package.

I have been working on an animated clip for my band frauen treffen männer Bad Vision featuring folk inspired silhouettes.

I have been working on the script and artwork for my second children’s book based around the adventures of five friends,  http://vagnvagensbygg.se/firmenit/51 the Toes. This particular story is based around the life of the little toe, Pinky.

In the month from September 17 to October 13 I will be travelling to Italy and Iceland where i hope to gain much needed inspiration from the blood stained coliseums of Rome to the hot fountain-ed Geysers of Iceland. I hope to especially emerse in the folk lore worlds of the trolls and fairies in the northern lands.

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Drawiing for one of the screenprints to be created for the Miscreants group show 2017.

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Miscreants images looking to the future

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015


Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

Miscreants Art Collective Nov 6 Off the Kerb 2015

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The Inaugural Miscreants Exhibition Nov 6. 2015

source The Scouts Midnight Woolf Pronto Tankerville Swim Team Thee Cha Cha Chas IMG_4751_1 IMG_4744_1 IMG_4732_1 IMG_4729_1 IMG_4724_1 IMG_4719_1 IMG_4718_1 IMG_4715_1 IMG_4764_1 Miscreants Artists Collective Exhibition
October 30-November 13
Opening November 6
Featured members:

Andrew Lang
Per Bystrom
Mel Grisancich
Brooke Penrose
Jerome Rush
Steve Gavan
Joel Morrison
TJ Day
Carolyn Hawkins
Lauren Rigbye
Lluis Fuzzhound

site de rencontre celibataire morbihan Manifesto
We are miscreants. We are a group of artists bonded together more through a love of music than anything else. It’s not the shiny well buffed sell or smell kind of music that your everyday normal gets fed through boxes of belief but the underbelly, the dirty, the rusty and the crusty. We watch it, we support it and live off a diet of it in its rawest brutalest and sometimes most graphic form.
We are miscreants. Graphic artists who, like the music we love, are at times graphic in nature. We are the ones who suck on a beer rather than sup on a Shiraz. We see the high-brow, wipe it away and look at it from beneath. We take culture and reflect upon its sub. We don’t take the high road we seep through the alley streets below.
We are miscreants. We look past the shine and see the beauty in the dirty and degenerate. We are not post-modern but we definitely come after something, we don’t have rhyme or reason but we often have a reason for a rhyme, we don’t know any better because we haven’t seen any worse. We are miscreants.

richtig traden mit binären optionen Post script
The exhibition went off with no bumps or bruises and despite the visitation of the local law and the presence of the paramedics, it was an alleyway steeped full of pleasure, pain, passion, and plain. The 11 Miscreants supped upon their creative goon sacks and came up with a technicolour vomit which displayed the inexorable link between the local Melbourne punk music scene and visual art.

As part of the Miscreants Artists Collective opening on Friday Nov 6 at Off the Kerb some of the artist’s bands played for free upstairs at the Tote. Featuring Midnight Woolf, Pronto, Bad Vision, Tankerville, Swim Team, the Scouts and thee Cha Cha Chas, the night was a blur of messy, crazy frantic figures and forms welded together by jagermisters and pints of beer. Hoping to have another Miscreants exhibition in 2016/2017 so stay tuned.

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Rush and Roulette

The Estranged at the Bendigo Hotel and the Tote 12/02/2015, 13/02/2015

Let me just preface this review by saying that The Estranged are a band who I have been go here really into for a while. You know you like a band when you get their album, you keep it on the flip and http://metodosalargarpene.es/ebioer/2784 your girlfriend begins to get pissed off with how many times you play it. The Estranged is that band. I got into them after discovering another band on Dirtnap Records, The Mind Spiders (who incidentally remind me of Jay Reatard, whose work I love).

The Estranged, are a band that features past and present members of Portland hardcore acts Remains Of The Day, Hellshock, Warcry, and Lebenden Toten. But I don’t really know about any of these. The recent four piece (they used to be a three piece) plays dark post-punk that calls to mind everyone from Joy Division and Echo and the Bunnymen to Australian bands like the New Christs and Radio Birdman to modern garage acts like The Spits.

The Estranged are the kind of band that you listen to and you feel like you have heard their songs before. They have that timeless, classic quality that is very rare. Live was no exception. Hailing from Portland, Oregon, with its rain and hipsters you can imagine that they would fit very nicely into the Melbourne scene; and despite the spaces between the humans in the crowd and the fact that they  arrived into Melbourne shortly before they played (after a 15 hour flight), they didn’t fail to deliver. The bass throbs through, directing the sound while the chorus driven 80’s guitar open chords ring out alongside the vocals with answer riffs. The addition of the second guitar fills out the sound and allows the space within the songs to really breathe. The lead singer/guitarist Mark Herman’s vocals have just the right amount of aggression, energy and fuzz which is juxtaposed with his ability to really sing and hold a note.

I loved both the shows and was at pains to understand why both venues weren’t packed to the rafters with punters. It could have had something to do with the line-ups they chose to have for the tour (when a crust punk dude asked at the merch desk what The Estranged are like, the merch guy said “Um kind of post-punky, rock and roll”, the Crust punk dude said “Crust?” and the merch guy explained no, that they were more rock than that, at which the monosyllabic guy attempted to confirm one last time, “crust?” just like he was ‘Groot’ from Gaurdians of the Galaxy and finally turned his nose up and walked off) . The Estranged have also toured with minimal advertising and no real gimmick which Melbourne seems to love (NoBunny, Hunx and his Punks, Gooch Palms, King Kahn) – except when the band is from Melbourne of course – perhaps The Estranged are so Melbourne that the cynical local band goer was unable to truly appreciate them for what they were.

To me The Estranged are the type of band who you could have listened to ten years ago or could put on in ten years time and they wouldn’t be out of place… and that place would be a spanking good one!

Last gig tonight at the NSC with Deep Heat, Miss Destiny, Power 16/02/2015

Live footage from the Bendigo 12/02 and the Tote 13/02

The Estranged the Bendigo Hotel 12/02/2015

The Estranged the Tote Hotel 13/02/2015

 

 

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In a Rush: Menangerie @ ACCA

Menangerie @ ACCA 13 December to 1 March.

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Menagerie

Exhibition/  13 December 2014 – 1 March 2015, ACCA

Menagerie is an exhibition at ACCA that’s based around the theme of animals and their relationship with self. As with most exhibitions at ACCA this was well thought out and presented.

You enter via the passage on the left and after being greeted by a work of video art comprising of footage of a man’s mouth, you move into a room of drawings by Patricia Picinnini. These drawings are of hummingbirds playing around in a woman’s hair which comes out of her backside and vagina.

The drawings are light and subtle and have the playfulness of some of her sculptures. They show the human less as a character and more as an environment to live in or use for creating a nest.

A sculpture I’ve seen before, of a bird in a pair of trainers by Ricky Swallow (the other darling of Australian Art) is presented in the middle of the room. It is whimsical and playful, perhaps referring to the resourcefulness of the bird to create a home in whatever environment is available. There are some works by Paul Wood who takes existing ceramic sculptures of animals and adds other things to them like for example the appearance of a draped cloth over a traditionally seated dog or German Shepherd. The draped cloth is actually a glass or ceramic of some sort glazed onto the dog.

There are a number of video installations throughout the exhibition, but for me, the pick of the bunch was the one of the deer and the wolf in an enclosed studio environment. I enjoyed watching the way they deal with the presence of each other in that space. There is anxiety, there is awkwardness, there is tension and then there is apathy. It looks closely at the interplay between the hunter and the hunted and could be in some way a metaphor for our own lives. There was also a drawing piece by Anastassia Klose who created a series of works based around her dog and her relationship with it. I like the idea of doing something based around one’s pet, as the relationship between master and animal is often very close and in some cases closer than some family members. There was the obligatory video as part of the drawings but really the images just didn’t have give me that feeling of familiarity and sense of love that I wanted out of them and I know that I have felt for my pets.

Overall the exhibition was good as far as most exhibitions go but it did seem a little like it was one of those considered to be a little bit of a space and time filler. Much of the work was of old paintings of hunting scenes, stuffed animals and twee drawings which had minimal impact on me. When you consider the importance of animals in art as symbols and metaphors and what a huge part they play in art, I came from the exhibition content but less inspired than I would’ve liked.

click here Menagerie“explores the human tendency to anthropomorphise through animals and their behaviors as a process of metaphoric discovery of the self”. Curated by ACCA Artistic Director Juliana Engberg, the exhibition features works by international and national artists including Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Joseph Beuys, Thomas Binks, Rosa Bonheur, Basil Bradley, Mircea Cantor, Maurizio Cattelan, Henry Coombes, Herbert Thomas Dicksee, Annika Eriksson, Elliott Erwitt, Fischli & Weiss, James Giles, H. Hall, Benjamin Herring Jnr, Robert Gligorov, Lucy Gunning, Deborah Kelly, Anastasia Klose, Loretta Lux, David Noonan, Michael Parekowhai, Patricia Piccinini, John Nost Sartorius, Sinibaldo Scorza, William Strutt, Ricky Swallow, Shannon Te Ao, Caroline Tisdall, Peter Wächtler, Amelie von Wulffen, Paul Wood, as well as historical works.

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A little Rushed: Thee Nodes. Who are you Mr Node?

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      Thee nodes May 2014 Northcote Social Club

Thee Nodes Filthy Gaze clip

One night in 2014 I went upstairs at the Tote and saw one of the best live performances I have ever witnessed: the punk band ‘Thee Nodes’ from Montreal, Canada. High intensity guitar sounds with screeching vocals ringing out above the fuzz which rips at the gutters of your being; but this show was way bigger than the music.

It was not something I liked because I thought I had to or that someone told me to. It was more visceral than that: I simply had no choice but to be blown away. The way ‘Mr Node’ displayed his vulnerability on stage, the way he confronted the audience, the way some of the audience reacted to his persona… He wore bandages around his head, augmenting his alienated, crazy, masochistic, sub-human character. I was terrified and mesmerised at the same time. Mr Node was like a living car crash that seemed to be outwardly battling with himself as if he was conjuring and exorcising the demons inside him all at once, while darling you to be a voyeur and chastising you for not looking away. “Fuck you!” he screeched at the audience, “You think this is a joke, you think this is a game? You think that I am seeking out some sort of fame? I hate you! I hate you more than you hate me! I hate every fucking person that I see! … Don’t look at me!”.

He used pitch effects on his vocals which amplified the dark, vulnerable, Golem-like character as he half-cowered, half-prowled around the stage, goading the audience to react to him; and they did: The audience seemed to violate him as they pulled at his bandages, kicked him, punched him and yelled abuse at him as his spider-like body scuttled past, until they had taken off his all his clothes and he stood there naked and vulnerable. It was then, at 18 minutes in, that Mr Node abruptly left the room and the gig ended. It’s unclear whether the singer (let’s make a distinction here between the singer and Mr Node) walked out because he’d had enough of the abuse or whether Mr Node’s intention was to bring the audience to a climax, a heightened state and leave them hanging, with his bandages in their hands, as if to catch them red-handed and force them to reflect upon the darkness of their own behaviour.

I had never witnessed anything like it before both in art or in music. The audience had basically assaulted him and yet it was as if they were part of the show and they knew at what point to begin ripping off his bandages and clothes. I can imagine GG Allen may have had a similar effect on an audience. Thee Nodes was much, much more than “just” a punk rock band performing; their show was performance art of the highest order. Paul Mc Carthy (the performance artist not Paul Mc Cartney the Beatle) would have been impressed.

It was because of the band’s effect on me that I simply had to go and see the documentary, ‘Who Are You, Mr Node?’ that screened upstairs at The Tote; the scene of the crime (their first live performance in Melbourne) that blew my mind so far off my head that it never quite came back. I was curious to see how the filmmakers would tackle the mystery of Mr Node, the band, and what other questions they would add to the ones I had. I wanted the film to add to the mystery, to keep the performance going, to increase the sense of Mr Node’s viciousness and vulnerability battling for supremacy, and to widen my senses as the band’s live performance had done.

Sadly, I was asking too much of the film. My expectations were way too high and unfortunately the video really tainted my vision of something that was so wonderfully raw, pure and vulnerable. The film turned out to be a mockumentary which attempted to explain, rather than question. It focused on the enigma that is Mr Node; each band member was interviewed, including Mr Node himself. The film showed his ‘living quarters’ (some room they had ‘found’ with some trash bags in it) as it tried to give us an insight into his persona and did so very poorly. The band members had no personality and were terrible actors, which sadly applies for Mr Node, too – A disappointing revelation, considering that I was ready to buy into what was surely going to be another utterly mesmerising layer to the intriguing world/performance of Thee Nodes.

The filmmakers also thought it appropriate to interview a ‘doctor’ about the singer’s “degenerative disease” which he allegedly contracted from a Tasmanian devil while on tour in Australia …Really? Come on! This wasn’t funny, it wasn’t insightful and it destroyed all the intrigue, edginess and darkness that the live performance created. It was nigh on painful to watch. The premise that Mr Node would have contracted a disease from a Tassie devil was so tragically lame, and was made worse by the shitty acting.

Ironically, the only good things about the film were the few seconds of live performance footage they included. Why oh why did they make this film??? I can only hope that the band, having presumably seen the film, will bury it and never let it raise its ugly (not good ugly), Z grade (not good z grade), severely disappointing head ever again.

The moral of this story is (my) curiosity killed Mr Node.

 

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Images of Fete

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Here are all the limited edition screenprints (minus Electric Fete A2 screen) featured in my latest exhibition with tatooist T.J Day at Federation square Atrium Gallery from Dec 3 to Dec 22 2013. These are currently still available to purchase by contacting me via email.

 

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Flash and Fete Exhibition No Vacancy Dec 2-Dec 21 Fed Square

 

Thanks to everyone who came to make the opening of our exhibition such a success! To those who didn’t you still have until the 21st of December to see the work…oh while your there you may want to pop in and have a peak of a little less significant exhibition, ‘Melbourne Now’. I dont know its just a thought?

 

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http://bossons-fute.fr/?fimerois=site-de-rencontre-ado-en-ligne-gratuit&8c7=95 JEROME RUSH T.J DAY EXHIBITION
Opening on Thursday the 5th December is an exhibition of paintings and screen-prints by Jerome Rush and T.J Day.
Day is a tattoo artist with a love and a passion for 50’s and 60’s design and tattoo “Flash”, designs which stereotypically adorn the walls of tattoo parlors created by an artist on paper or card to show the tattoo shop walk in customer.
Day pulls her work from the cherished shoulder of a mustachioed side show muscleman and pastes them onto designs you may have found in a housewives kitchen circa 1950. The illustrative designs sit happily upon each other like two lost lovers who have reunited their lost union.
Rush is an artist/musician who has been making accessible art of all types for many years now. From puppets to rock and roll bands, from children’s books to graphic novels, from paintings to drawings, from etchings to screen-prints, Rush has had his finger in many pies.
The work he has created for this show draws influence from the collars of 16th Century Queens and, like Day, the sideshow alley games like the Shooting Gallery. Rush uses these symbols as a metaphor for life and makes us ask the question whether “Fate” (Fete) can play a part.
Both of the artists seem to find influence in the works of older comics and of more contemporary graphic novelists like the Hernandez brothers (Love and Rockets) and Charles Burns (Black Hole).
The exhibition will be open from Dec 5 to Dec 21.
Opening Thursday December 5, from 6 to 9pm. No Vacancy Gallery, Project Space, the Atrium Federation Square.
All works will be for sale on the evening.
This exhibition is proudly supported by Sailor Jerry Rum.

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Eggsellent evening!

A tribute was made, glasses were raised and musicians were praised. Was great to see so many faces for the opening, if you missed it try to get on down to Egg  Gallery @ 66a Johnston st Weds to Sun 1-5pm until the 24th September.

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